Missing and murdered Indigenous Women

Missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada

Hello everyone!

In a previous post, I discussed the missing and murdered women in Canada including the fact woman fan pow wowthat approximately 80% of them are Aboriginal. I included a video of the Women’s warrior song sung in honor of the missing and deceased women (I had the pleasure and honor to sing the song 2 days ago). I just want to add here that the song stands not only for the missing Aboriginal women in Canada but also symbolizes the strength of women. Women are the life carriers and life givers. We carry a strong energy that balances the men’s energy.

I recently came across this article, which warmed my heart. For the first time, an event of this scale is taking place in the USA to honor the missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada. The event: Sing our Rivers Red taking place at North Dakota state university from Feb 9 to Feb 14. On display, you will see women’s jewelry. Beaded earrings are displayed, each missing its other half in honor of the Indigenous women who have gone missing since 1980.

beaded earringsThe event aims to increase awareness for all the missing and murdered native women while encouraging bonding within the communities. As one of the organizers said: “These women have been murdered or they’re missing, but they shouldn’t be forgotten. They shouldn’t be ignored, and they should be known”. It warms my heart to hear that, as each of those women has a face, a family, friends and a community. I am including here, a link to see the missing women from the Highway of Tears, the name given to the highway between Prince Rupert and Prince George in British Columbia. It makes it real maybe, but please take a moment to look at their faces.

As I have said many times before, there is such beauty within the Native culture but there is also trauma. Indigenous women are more likely to have been physically or sexually assaulted than any other race and about a third of Native women report having been raped in their lifetime, according to the U.S. Dept. of Justice. The statistics are similar in Canada. Native women are survivors, they are a pillar of strength. Strength that comes from their voices and our voices. We must remember All my Relations, as we are all related and connected. What happens to one of us, happens and affects all of us. We are all sisters and brothers. It saddens me that so many Native women (and men) have passed into the spirit world. However, as the prayer below (a version of the Hopi prayer, a prayer for those grieving) tell us, our relatives and ancestors are around us. They are in the wind, in the sky, in the land. They are there with us to give us. And I find that very reassuring.

Mitakuye Oyasin

native prayer for grieving

 

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